FAQ

All FAQ's

Does KCRC remove dead animals from the road or side of the road?

Crews will remove large dead animals, like deer, from KCRC’s right-of-way.  We will also remove smaller animals, like raccoons, from the drivable portion of the roadway. Our crews will make an effort to contact the owner of a domestic dead animal if identification can be determined. To report a dead animal, contact KCRC via Report an Issue or call KCRC at 616-242-6950. 

How can I get KCRC to fix a pothole on my street?

Complete the online “Report an Issue” form or call KCRC at 616-242-6950. 

I have an emergency; how do I get my road cleared immediately?

KCRC does not respond to special requests except through law enforcement and fire services. Residents experiencing an emergency situation should call 911. KCRC will respond as directed by law enforcement. 

If a tree falls in the traveled portion of the roadway designed for public travel; what do I do?

Please call the KCRC office immediately at 616-242-6950. The fallen trees will be moved outside of the road right-of-way when possible.  The relocated fallen tree will be left for the property owner’s use and/or disposal.  

My car hit a pothole and incurred damage. How do I get reimbursed?

Questions concerning claims are often made to the Road Commission when damage occurs to a vehicle that is caused by road conditions. Please be advised that under state law MCLA 691.1403, the Kent County Road Commission cannot be held liable for damages due to a road defect, like a pothole.  In order for a claim to be eligible for reimbursement, KCRC must have been aware of the pothole for 30 days without repairing it. 

What are “All Season” roads?

“All Season” roads are not subject to weight restrictions, which means that heavy-load trucks may drive on them all year. Non-all-season roads are subject to weight restrictions during the annual thaw period (late winter-early spring) to prevent damage to these roads. (When thawing occurs, ground beneath the roadbed can soften and make the surface susceptible to damage from heavy loads.) 

What does “Weather Dependent” mean?

Cold temperatures and wet/rainy weather affects the schedule of road work, not just day-to-day, but at times, hour to hour.  

Much of the material used for pavement preservation treatments and resurfacing is weather and temperature dependent and therefore cannot be applied until conditions are warm and dry. When one job gets postponed, it impacts both KCRC and its contractors’ schedules. Working together, KCRC and its contractors make adjustments to the original scheduling with the goal of meeting projects’ targeted completion dates. 

During rainy conditions, KCRC crews will shift focus to address jobs that are not weather-sensitive, including construction preparation like milling, and maintenance activities like ditching, drainage and brush work, and guardrail repair. 

What happens to trees that may impact a project improvement?

KCRC takes a proactive approach to save or remove trees that are impacted by a road improvement project. Informational meetings are held for major improvement projects during which property owners can meet with KCRC representatives to discuss the upcoming project and the potential tree impact. 

What is KCRC’s policy for mailbox damage?

KCRC investigates each complaint regarding a mailbox damaged during snow removal. If an inspection shows that the mailbox was hit by a plow or other KCRC equipment, KCRC will replace the mailbox. However, if damage was caused by thrown ice or snow coming off of the plow, mailbox repair is the responsibility of the property owner. Click the following for KCRC Mailbox Policy or to Report Mailbox Damage.

What roads and bridges are part of Kent County Road Commission’s network?

KCRC maintains 1957 miles of roads and 172 bridges within the County of Kent, exclusive of those that fall under the jurisdiction of the State, cities and villages.  KCRC also provides routine and winter maintenance for 436 miles of state trunklines under a multi-year contract with the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT).   

Why Are Crew Members just “standing around” the work site?

There are a number of reasons why crews may have to break for a period of time while working on a road project. A vital piece of equipment may have broken down and a replacement or repair is being addressed; work may be occurring in intervals, and the employees you see may have just completed their task and are waiting for the next step of the process to be completed; another crew member may be replenishing the necessary material or aggregate; or weather conditions may have changed causing a potential schedule change.  

Why are European roads in better condition?

Because far more resources are dedicated to the maintenance and preservation of European road networks Let’s do a price comparison in US dollars by gallon: For a US gallon of gas costing $3.27, 43 cents of that goes to taxes. In England, the same gallon of gas would cost you $7.23 of which $4.63 accounts for taxes. While our roads are built to industry standards, we invest less in their timely preservation treatments and routine maintenance to extend their lifespan. 

Why are pavement and ground temperatures important? Why not rely on air temperature?

The ability of salt or other deicing agents to melt snow and ice depends on the temperature of the road - not the air, and the two temperatures can differ by as much as 20°F.  

Why are you putting “tar and gravel” on our paved road?

The process called “sealcoating” is a relatively low cost method of pavement preservation that helps prevent water from seeping into and softening the base of the road. This restricts compromising elements like cracks and potholes from forming. 

The tar-like substance is actually an emulsion of water and liquid asphalt which penetrates and seals small cracks in the existing pavement. The “gravel” is actually a pea-size aggregate that sticks to the emulsion and, after rolling and sweeping, provides a skid-resistant surface to improve safety.  
 
As vehicles travel over the new surface, some of the aggregate may come loose under the tires. When a motorist encounters a newly chip sealed road, which will be marked with "Loose Gravel" signs, the best practice is to reduce one’s speed and keep plenty of distance from the vehicle in front of you.  

Why is this road being treated when our road looks much worse?

It can be frustrating to see crews working on a road in better condition than nearby deteriorated stretches. There is, however, a reason for this – and it includes saving money over the long-term and extending the service life of our roads.  Think of your car. You can wait until the engine fails before taking the car to be fixed, or you can take it in for routine oil changes. With the routine oil changes, your car will not only run smoother, it will likely run longer with less costly repairs. Treatments on roads in good or fair condition work similarly. Rather than waiting several years until the road deteriorates to poor condition, when expensive reconstruction may be necessary, a lower-cost surface treatment can be applied, which will extend the life of the road at a fraction of the cost for structural resurfacing or reconstruction.  This practice is call “pavement preservation”. Therefore, KCRC employs a “mix of fixes” philosophy in maintaining the country’s roadway network that combines pavement preservation treatments, resurfacing and reconstruction. In doing so, KCRC can maximize miles in good or fair condition within the constraints of available revenue from the Michigan Transportation Fund (MTF).