Routine Maintenance

KCRC Routine Maintenance includes ongoing work completed on the roads, roadside and bridges to keep assets in good repair and functioning properly. These efforts help to prolong the life of a road or bridge by preventing premature deterioration. 

Road Maintenance: Response to minor pavement defects caused by a combination of traffic and environmental effects. These activities can include crack sealing, pothole patching, and grading. 

Roadside Maintenance: These activities are conducted outside of the road surface and include drainage work and ditching, culvert and guardrail repair, tree trimming and vegetation control.

FAQ's

Does KCRC remove dead animals from the road or side of the road?

Crews will remove large dead animals, like deer, from KCRC’s right-of-way.  We will also remove smaller animals, like raccoons, from the drivable portion of the roadway. Our crews will make an effort to contact the owner of a domestic dead animal if identification can be determined. To report a dead animal, contact KCRC via Report an Issue or call KCRC at 616-242-6950. 

If a tree falls in the traveled portion of the roadway designed for public travel; what do I do?

Please call the KCRC office immediately at 616-242-6950. The fallen trees will be moved outside of the road right-of-way when possible.  The relocated fallen tree will be left for the property owner’s use and/or disposal.  

Why are pavement and ground temperatures important? Why not rely on air temperature?

The ability of salt or other deicing agents to melt snow and ice depends on the temperature of the road - not the air, and the two temperatures can differ by as much as 20°F.  

Why are you putting “tar and gravel” on our paved road?

The process called “sealcoating” is a relatively low cost method of pavement preservation that helps prevent water from seeping into and softening the base of the road. This restricts compromising elements like cracks and potholes from forming. 

The tar-like substance is actually an emulsion of water and liquid asphalt which penetrates and seals small cracks in the existing pavement. The “gravel” is actually a pea-size aggregate that sticks to the emulsion and, after rolling and sweeping, provides a skid-resistant surface to improve safety.  
 
As vehicles travel over the new surface, some of the aggregate may come loose under the tires. When a motorist…

Why Are Crew Members just “standing around” the work site?

There are a number of reasons why crews may have to break for a period of time while working on a road project. A vital piece of equipment may have broken down and a replacement or repair is being addressed; work may be occurring in intervals, and the employees you see may have just completed their task and are waiting for the next step of the process to be completed; another crew member may be replenishing the necessary material or aggregate; or weather conditions may have changed causing a potential schedule change.  

Why is this road being treated when our road looks much worse?

It can be frustrating to see crews working on a road in better condition than nearby deteriorated stretches. There is, however, a reason for this – and it includes saving money over the long-term and extending the service life of our roads.  Think of your car. You can wait until the engine fails before taking the car to be fixed, or you can take it in for routine oil changes. With the routine oil changes, your car will not only run smoother, it will likely run longer with less costly repairs. Treatments on roads in…